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Unwind Outside: Our favorite outdoor happy hour spots

There are few things I love as much as fall in Las Vegas. With the official end of summer comes a few major perks (like the ability to touch your steering wheel when you first get in your car), but my all-time favorite has to be the fact that the nights cool down enough for you to enjoy an evening meal and some cocktails outside. Today, I wanted to share with you some of my team’s favorite happy hour spots around town to have a brew or two (or three) outside.

DTLV:
Park on Fremont is a favorite among clients of mine. They offer two outdoor seating areas--one is right up front and the other is tucked away behind the restaurant. The patio out back is surrounded by tons of mature vegetation and string lights, so you almost forget you’re in downtown Las Vegas. There’s even a hidden teeter-totter (try to find it next time you’re there) that gets more and more tempting as the drinks flow.


Park offers happy hour Monday-Friday from 4-7 and Monday-Thursday from 11-close. Their garbage fries and chicken bar bites (complete with a corn-flake crust) are amazing, albeit not the healthiest options (if you want some healthy dining options in the Valley, check out our post on Healthy Living in LV). They also offer a happy hour brunch on the weekends where, for $20, you can get a carafe of OJ and a bottle of champagne. Yes, please. While downtown living isn’t for everyone, I always think about how great it would be to be able to walk from a place like Park (after a few beers) to your house. If big-city life is something you’re up for, check out these available units at The Ogden (literally a 30-second walk from Park).

Summerlin:
Tivoli Village at Queensridge has a few solid options for outdoor happy-hour dining, but one I hear a lot about is Social Bistro & Wine Bar (Unfortunately,...

Gated Communities: A Break Down

Today, I will address a topic that clients and friends ask me about regularly--gated communities. There are obvious additional benefits to living in a gated community (they can be much safer, the aesthetic is usually nicer, they’re a practical alternative to medieval moats, the list goes on), but with additional benefits come additional costs. Let's break down of the main types of gated communities and talk a little bit about what each offers.

Two types of gated communities exist in Las Vegas--gated and guard gated. The difference between the two is pretty self-explanatory: gated communities offer a gate accessible by a code or a remote control, while guard gated communities have the added benefit of a person situated in a guard house, greeting each guest, checking IDs, etc.

The main benefit of living in a guard-gated community is that it prevents “piggybacking” (cars trailing behind an initial car once the gate opens). Only those who are 'authorized' to go past the guard gate will be permitted inside the community. The landscape and aesthetic appeal of the entrances of guard-gated communities also tends to be nicer than that of gated communities without a guard house. (How can anyone forget the iron-horse-laden entrances to Queensridge North & South?)

For some home buyers, the added security (and possibility of giant horse statues greeting you) is a huge bonus--for others, it isn’t a necessity. That all really depends on personal preference. Keep in mind though, that HOA fees in a guard-gated community are going to be higher than in their gated counterparts--you’re helping to cover the cost of the guards’ wages and additional security. On the flip side of the increased HOA fees, is the fact that both gated and guard-gated communities generally command a higher price in the real estate market than similarly sized homes in non-gated communities.

One thing people frequently ask me when it comes...